The streets of Pingyuang were empty when Andre and Willy left early in the morning…

The streets of Pingyuang were empty when Andre and Willy left early in the morning…

 

Todays goal was to reach the city of Xian which many years ago was regarded  as the biggest city in the world.

 

Nowadays the city is more known for being close to a huge discovery made in 1974 …

Farmers digging a well in a field approximately 20 miles east of Xi’an stumbled upon a pit containing 6,000 life-size terra cotta statues in March 1974. The site was soon identified as the burial place of Emperor Qin, and excavations began almost immediately. Historians now believe that some 700,000 workers worked for nearly three decades on the mausoleum. So far, archaeologists have uncovered a 20-square-mile compound, including some 8,000 terra cotta soldiers, along with numerous horses and chariots, a pyramid mound marking the emperor’s tomb, remains of a palace, offices, store houses and stables. In addition to the large pit containing the 6,000 soldiers, a second pit was found with cavalry and infantry units and a third containing high-ranking officers and chariots. A fourth pit remained empty, suggesting that the burial pit was left unfinished at the time the emperor died.

 

The road to Xian was nice and easy and just before arrival at the Terracotta Soldiers side a nice drive was enjoyed by the team going through some small villages.

The visit to emperor  Huangs terracotta army was again most amazing and the team could only imagine how much time and effort was put into this scene of ancient times.

The complex of this huge side consists of 4 main buildings showing the various stages from discovering the site to excavation processes and finally the line up of the army itself.

 

Here are the pictures to give you some idea of what the boys did see…

Huangs terracotta army

 
Chariots..

Chariots..

 
standing if front of the Terracotta army….
standing if front of the Terracotta army….

 

After a 200-year period of provincial conflict called the Warring States Period, Qin Shi Huang is credited with unifying the provinces under one centralized government and establishing the capital at Xianyang. The stability of his rule enabled China to experience great advances in politics, economy and culture, including the introduction of a standard written script, a system of canals and roads, advances in metallurgy, standardized weights and measures and large-scale public works projects like the early Great Wall. However, Qin was also known for his brutishness: He ordered the killings of scholars whose ideas he opposed, and showed little regard for the life of the conscripts who built those public works projects, including his burial complex. Numerous laborers and artisans lost their lives during its construction, while others were reportedly killed in order to preserve the secrecy of the tomb’s location and the treasures buried within.

 

The walking through the various sites which are adjoined by beautiful gardens took the boys almost 3 hours and will remain in their memory for quiet a long time as this is something which is not similar to anything they did see on their previous trips..

 
Not one soldiers face looks like the other one
Not one soldiers face looks like the other one..

 

Looking at this 8th world wonder in disbelief - Willy

Looking at this 8th world wonder in disbelief - Andre
Looking at this 8th world wonder in disbelief….

 
Huangs terracotta army 3

Huangs terracotta army 2

leaving the complex thye boys decided to buy their memorial T-shirts and post for some pictures themselves..

 
Lipstick warriors join terracotta soldiers….

Lipstick warriors join terracotta soldiers….

 
The guy behind Team Lipstick is the famous emperor Qin Shi Huang

The guy behind Team Lipstick is the famous emperor Qin Shi Huang who ordered the terracotta soldiers to be constructed to safeguard his existence in his next life…
 
After a 200-year period of provincial conflict called the Warring States Period, Qin Shi Huang is credited with unifying the provinces under one centralized government and establishing the capital at Xianyang. The stability of his rule enabled China to experience great advances in politics, economy and culture, including the introduction of a standard written script, a system of canals and roads, advances in metallurgy, standardized weights and measures and large-scale public works projects like the early Great Wall. However, Qin was also known for his brutishness: He ordered the killings of scholars whose ideas he opposed, and showed little regard for the life of the conscripts who built those public works projects, including his burial complex. Numerous laborers and artisans lost their lives during its construction, while others were reportedly killed in order to preserve the secrecy of the tomb’s location and the treasures buried within.

 

On the road again and team Lipstick headed to the centre of Xian which at one stage was a major trading point along the silk road…

 

Xi’athe capital of Shaanxi province, located in the northwest of China, in the center of the Guanzhong Plain

 

One of the oldest cities in China, the city was known as Chang’an before the Ming dynasty.

 

 Xi’an is the oldest of the Four Great Ancient Capitals of China, having held the position under several of the most important dynasties in Chinese history including Zhou, Qin, Han, Sui, and Tang

 

 Xi’an is the starting point of the Silk Road and home to the Terracotta Army of Emperor Qin Shi Huang.[1

 

night markets of Xiang

the heat coming from the various cooking stalls on the pavements created quiet some sweat for the boys

The day ended with along walk along the night markets of Xiang where the outside temperature of 34degrees and the heat coming from the various cooking stalls on the pavements created quiet some sweat for the boys…

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